Silver Cap Fell Off Baby Tooth

If a silver cap fell off your child’s baby tooth, don’t worry. This is common, and there are a few things you can do. Silver caps may fall off for several reasons, such as trauma, decay, or simply because the baby tooth is falling out. In this blog post, we’ll give you a few tips on what to do if your child’s silver cap falls off their baby tooth.

What are Silver Caps?

In pediatric dentistry, The term silver cap is used to describe a prefabricated stainless steel crown. They are usually used to restore decayed or damaged baby teeth. Silver caps are the most common type of dental crown used in children. They are strong and durable. However, they are unaesthetic due to their shiny silver color.

Why A Silver Cap Fell Off My Child’s Baby Tooth?

There are several reasons why silver caps may fall off baby teeth, including:

  • Tooth decay and infection: The decay may cause the silver cap to loosen and eventually fall off. You can read more about baby bottle teeth rot.
  • Frequent biting or chewing on hard objects: This can cause the silver cap to become dislodged.
  • Trauma: The silver cap may fall off if your child experiences trauma to the mouth, such as falling and hitting their mouth on a hard surface.
  • The silver cap is not cemented correctly: If a silver cap is not cemented correctly, it may fall off.
  • The falling out of the baby tooth: The silver cap and baby tooth may fall together because the permanent tooth naturally pushes the primary tooth out.
  • The silver cap is too big: If the silver cap is too big, it may fall off due to the extra space.
  • The silver cap is too small: The silver cap that is too small may also fall off because it doesn’t fit properly.
Prefabricated Stainless Steel Crowns (Silver Caps)
The silver cap is a term used to describe a prefabricated stainless steel crown.

What To Do If Your Child’s Silver Cap Fell Off Their Baby Tooth?

If the silver cap falls off, it’s important to take your child to see the dentist as soon as possible. In the meantime, here are a few things you can do:

  • Brush your child’s baby teeth with a soft-bristled toothbrush and water to remove any debris. You can read more about teaching dental hygiene to preschoolers.
  • Give your child soft foods to eat and avoid hard or chewy foods.
  • Don’t put the silver cap back on the tooth because your child may swallow it if it comes off again.
  • If your child is in pain, you can give them over-the-counter pain medication.
  • Save the silver cap in a safe place and take it with you to the dentist’s appointment.

What Will The Dentist Do?

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Did the silver cap on your child’s baby tooth fell off due to tooth decay or poor cementation? The dentist will identify the problem first to determine the best course of action. They will perform an oral examination and take x-rays. After that, the dentist will:

  • Recement the silver cap: If the silver cap is in good condition and the baby tooth is healthy, the dentist will recement it back into place.
  • Replace the silver cap: If the silver cap is damaged or the baby’s tooth is decayed, the dentist will clean out the decay and replace the silver cap with a new one.
  • Space maintainer: If the baby tooth is severely damaged, the dentist will extract the tooth and place a space maintainer to keep the space open until the permanent tooth comes in.
  • Do nothing: When the silver crown and baby tooth fall together due to the eruption of the permanent tooth, the dentist will do nothing. You need to monitor the area to make sure the permanent tooth is coming in properly.

You can read more about a loose baby Tooth with a crown.

Silver Cap Fell Off Baby Tooth – Conclusion

Did the silver cap fall off your child’s baby tooth? Don’t worry; it happens. Just take your child to see the dentist as soon as possible. In the meantime, brush their teeth and give them soft foods to eat. Also, don’t put the silver cap back on the tooth and save it in a safe place. The dentist will determine the best course of action. They may recement the cap, replace it with a new one, or extract the tooth.

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